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> Plant Succession
J Wells
post Jun 16 2005, 04:01 PM
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Crum-

A couple of questions:

1. What effect would warmer global temperatures have on the gowing cycle and abundance of pioneer plants of the tundra (i.e. lichen, moss), and how might it influence primary plant succession on areas exposed due to glacial retreat?

2. What effect would a change in primary and secondary plant sucession have on the animal biodiversity of the region?

Thanks in advance for taking time to respond, and please keep posting those great pictures!

Justin
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Tom_Crumrine
post Jun 16 2005, 04:11 PM
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Justin,

Your first question is part of what Donie is working on. How do tundra species respond to changes in the environment? The changes you described are somewhat like what she is trying to replicate in the plots we are working on. I'll ask her to make sure but I think that early results seem to indicate that more nutrients in the soil soil as a result of warming may decrease the amount of moss. I will ask her when I see her at breakfast.

I'm not sure about the glacier question. I think there is someone here that knows more about that. I'll get back to you. Check this section again and I'll post another reply her.

Crum
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Tom_Crumrine
post Jun 24 2005, 04:28 AM
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Justin,

I have been talking with people for a while about glaciers and research on them. Current glacier retreat research is being done in other areas because the glaciers around here began to retreat a while ago.

The one thing I found out is that in the literature it does refer to the fact that other plants don't come in until plants that fix nitrogen enter. That probably seems like an obvious thing but if the soil is truly undisturbed and fairly low on nutrients then they need to have fixed nitrogen to get started. So plants that can take it out of the air an get it into the soil tend to be the ones to enter first.

I hope this helps--write back if it doesn't,
CRUM
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J Wells
post Jun 27 2005, 09:37 PM
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Thanks for getting back to me with more info!....I realize that you are working hard and don't have time to research and write pages and pages on each question. I'm sure we'll go into more depth when when time permits. (it takes me a good 20 minutes to type this much!)
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Tom_Crumrine
post Jun 28 2005, 05:51 AM
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Justin,

I will meet you to further discuss global warming and other world issues on the morning of August 7th at 11:00 am.

Crum
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