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> A few questions
Tweet Geography
post Nov 23 2005, 07:11 AM
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So far my geography students have really liked following your Antarctic adventure. Here are some questions collected from all four classes.

PER 2:
What kinds of animals have you seen so far?

PER 4:
How is the food there? Do you have anything like pizza?

PER 5:
How's the weather? Do you sleep in all your jackets and stuff? How do you takes showers if it is so cold?
How many people live in the place where you are at? Is it like a city? What do you do for entertainment?
What time do you go to bed? Is the sun out when you go to sleep? What is the time difference between here and there?

PER 7:
Why is it called Pony Lake? Do any animals live in the lake? How can plants/plant-like organizisms live in the lake if it is dark half the year? What is a "Terrabus" (is it one of those tractor things that you see in movies)? Can you send a picture of one from the outside? And maybe a picture with a penguin?

Sorry for all the questions! Keep up the good work.
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Dena_Rosenberger
post Nov 25 2005, 02:35 AM
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Hello to Mr. Tweet's Geography classes!

Let me answer these questions in order...
Per 2
There aren't as many animals that live in Antarctica as we are used to seeing in the U.S. because the climate is so extreme. I have seen Weddell seals, an Emperor penguin, lot's of Adelie penguins, and many Skuas, the predator/scavenger bird.

Per 4
The food in the cafeteria is pretty good and they try to have different things every day. Today for lunch there were quesadillas and other Mexican foods (not as good as La Posta), and for dinners there are usually several choices, with meat and vegetarian. There are not many fresh fruits and vegetables because the plane with supplies only comes once a week or once every two weeks. When they come in, they are called "freshies" and we will have salad available that day. They do a good job making lot's of food choices. We haven't had pizza yet, but we may. Usually they have things like spaghetti, lasagna, salmon, roast beef, potatoes, chicken, and various casseroles, at least three main choices per night in addition to the vegetarian choices and cold salads. Breakfast is always eggs, ham, bacon, potatos, toast, muffins, very fresh breads, cold cereals, or you can wait in the omelet line. Good stuff!

Per 5
McMurdo Research Station is like a small city with about 1000 people. Some of them are scientists and some are support people. All of the buildings are trailer-like. I sleep in a dorm room with a roommate, (see photos on website) and a big bathroom down the hall. It is just like living in a house. They keep the temperature warm and we leave the window open a little bit sometimes because it is too warm. My floor is just for women and the bathroom has lot's of stalls and showers, like in the P.E. room at school. The men's dorm is downstairs. There are LOT'S of dormitory buildings for all of the people here! Sometimes the scientists are only in town for a few days before they go out to a field camp to do their research. They may be out there for several weeks and they cannot leave any trace of humans at the field site.

They try to have many things to do for entertainment. There is a gym with basketball and volleyball courts, there are lectures on science and culture and travel, there are movie nights, there is a big selection of every movie available on DVD, there are yoga and other exercise classes, there is a bowling alley, a library, and a coffeehouse. Everything is completely free except they have a store for buying T-shirts, hats, posters, etc.

The sun is out 24-7 until February when the first sunset will occur. It just goes around in a circle! It is sometimes hard to sleep, but I am usually so tired that I fall right asleep. The window in my room doesn't really have curtains (see website for pics of my room), but you get used to the sun. EVERYONE here wears sunglasses and sunscreen when walking outside, even between buildings. The reason is that the ozone hole over Antarctica caused by pollution from around the world lets through very harmful UV rays, way more than in the U.S. These rays can cause skin cancer and eye problems. They try to make normal schedules for everyone but some people (like janitors) work at "night." I am 21 hours AHEAD of you in San Diego! So it is tomorrow for me when you are reading this!

Per 7
It is called Pony Lake because of Ernest Shackelton's ponies (see website). No animals live in the lake, only algae and bacteria. The scientists I am working with are actually studying how these things can survive the darkness for six months. They think that the algae may be able to switch over from being autotrophs (being able to use the sun to photosynthesize their own energy) to heterotrophs (getting carbon from "eating" or absorbing other organisms) over the winter.

The Terrabus is a great big bus thing with big wheels. I will go get a picture of one. They are made to be able to travel through any kind of weather with many people on board.

Check the website for penguin pics!

Ms. R.
from the ice



QUOTE(Tweet Geography @ Nov 23 2005, 07:11 AM)
So far my geography students have really liked following your Antarctic adventure.  Here are some questions collected from all four classes.

PER 2:
What kinds of animals have you seen so far?

PER 4:
How is the food there?  Do you have anything like pizza?

PER 5:
How's the weather?  Do you sleep in all your jackets and stuff?  How do you takes showers if it is so cold?
How many people live in the place where you are at?  Is it like a city?  What do you do for entertainment?
What time do you go to bed?  Is the sun out when you go to sleep?  What is the time difference between here and there?

PER 7:
Why is it called Pony Lake?  Do any animals live in the lake?  How can plants/plant-like organizisms live in the lake if it is dark half the year?  What is a "Terrabus" (is it one of those tractor things that you see in movies)?  Can you send a picture of one from the outside?  And maybe a picture with a penguin?

Sorry for all the questions!  Keep up the good work.
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